Tag Archives: Prevention

WHO updates fact sheet on Hypertension (16 May 2019)

The World Health Organization (WHO) has updated its fact sheet on hypertension.

Background Information:

Blood pressure is the force exerted by circulating blood against the walls of the body’s arteries, the major blood vessels in the body. Hypertension is when blood pressure is too high.

Blood pressure is written as two numbers. The first (systolic) number represents the pressure in blood vessels when the heart contracts or beats. The second (diastolic) number represents the pressure in the vessels when the heart rests between beats.

Hypertension is diagnosed if, when it is measured on two different days, the systolic blood pressure readings on both days is ≥140 mmHg and/or the diastolic blood pressure readings on both days is ≥90 mmHg.

Key Messages:

Hypertension – or elevated blood pressure – is a serious medical condition that significantly increases the risks of heart, brain, kidney and other diseases.

An estimated 1.13 billion people worldwide have hypertension, most (two-thirds) living in low- and middle-income countries.

In 2015, 1 in 4 men and 1 in 5 women had hypertension.  

Fewer than 1 in 5 people with hypertension have the problem under control. 

Hypertension is a major cause of premature death worldwide.

The WHO African Region has the highest prevalence of hypertension (27%) while the WHO Region of the Americas has the lowest prevalence of hypertension (18%).

A review of current trends shows that the number of adults with hypertension increased from 594 million in 1975 to 1.13 billion in 2015, with the increase seen largely in low- and middle-income countries. This increase is due mainly to a rise in hypertension risk factors in those populations.

One of the global targets for noncommunicable diseases is to reduce the prevalence of hypertension by 25% by 2025 (baseline 2010).

Risk Factors

Modifiable:

  • unhealthy diets (excessive salt consumption, a diet high in saturated fat and trans fats, low intake of fruits and vegetables),
  • physical inactivity,
  • consumption of tobacco and alcohol, and
  • being overweight or obese.

Non-Modifiable:

  • family history of hypertension,
  • age over 65 years and
  • co-existing diseases such as diabetes or kidney disease.

Symptoms:

Hypertension is called a “silent killer”. Most people with hypertension are unaware of the problem because it may have no warning signs or symptoms. For this reason, it is essential that blood pressure is measured regularly.

When symptoms do occur, they can include

  • early morning headaches,
  • nosebleeds,
  • irregular heart rhythms,
  • vision changes, and
  • buzzing in the ears.

Severe hypertension can cause

  • fatigue,
  • nausea,
  • vomiting,
  • confusion,
  • anxiety,
  • chest pain, and
  • muscle tremors.

The only way to detect hypertension is to have a health professional measure blood pressure. Having blood pressure measured is quick and painless.

Complications:

Hypertension can cause serious damage to the heart. Excessive pressure can harden arteries, decreasing the flow of blood and oxygen to the heart. This elevated pressure and reduced blood flow can cause:

  • Chest pain, also called angina.
  • Heart attack, which occurs when the blood supply to the heart is blocked and heart muscle cells die from lack of oxygen. The longer the blood flow is blocked, the greater the damage to the heart.
  • Heart failure, which occurs when the heart cannot pump enough blood and oxygen to other vital body organs.
  • Irregular heart beat which can lead to a sudden death.

Hypertension can also burst or block arteries that supply blood and oxygen to the brain, causing a stroke.

In addition, hypertension can cause kidney damage, leading to kidney failure.

Prevention and Control:

Prevention

  • Reducing salt intake (to less than 5g daily)
  • Eating more fruit and vegetables
  • Being physically active on a regular basis
  • Avoiding use of tobacco
  • Reducing alcohol consumption
  • Limiting the intake of foods high in saturated fats
  • Eliminating/reducing trans fats in diet

Management

  • Reducing and managing mental stress
  • Regularly checking blood pressure
  • Treating high blood pressure
  • Managing other medical conditions

Useful Links:

Link to the updated fact sheet:

https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/hypertension

Link to WHO’s Question and Answer page on hypertension:

https://www.who.int/features/qa/82/en/

Link to WHO guideline ‘Sodium intake for Adults and Children’:

https://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/guidelines/sodium_intake/en/

Link to WHO video on hypertension:

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